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November 24, 2016

6 Simple Tips to Reduce Bounce Rate

6 Simple Tips to Reduce Bounce Rate

Hello, folks. Today, we will share with you simple tips to reduce your website’s bounce rate. Some of them will even improve your conversion rate and other metrics.

TL;DR

  1. Improve your website’s speed.
  2. Make the visitor want to explore your website.
  3. Reduce the number of distractions.
  4. Have a simple and straightforward call to action.
  5. Improve the responsiveness of your website.
  6. Have a well set-up Google Analytics event tracker.

TO REDUCE YOUR WEBSITE’S BOUNCE RATE:

1. IMPROVE YOUR WEBSITE’S SPEED

The first and most important tip is to reduce your website’s loading times. Fourty-seven percent of internet users expect web pages to load in two seconds or less. We know that this is almost impossible to achieve with the newer and heavier layouts, but it does not mean that we should give up trying. A simple reduction of 500ms can do wonders for your bounce rate. You can reduce your website’s loading times by using a caching plugin, especially if you use WordPress. By the way, we recommend the WP Super Cache plugin. Alternatively, you can use a CDN (content delivery network) service. There are plenty out there. If you search “CDN” on Google, you will find many providers.

2. MAKE THE VISITOR NEED TO FURTHER EXPLORE YOUR WEBSITE

This is relevant and straightforward. By creating great content and inserting contextual links to other blog posts you have, you will create the urge for the visitor to check more pages. Let’s say that you are creating a blog post with simple tips to reduce bounce rate, but your visitor does not know what bounce rate is and how Google Analytics track it, but you have an excellent post about it. What do you do? You insert a link to that great blog post you wrote, like we did above. 🙂

3. REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF DISTRACTION

How many times have you accessed a website and had a great feeling about their content, but then you got overwhelmed by ads, sidebar widgets, and lightboxes asking for your e-mail that you simply gave up and hit CTRL+W? Yes, that happens a lot! What you need here is to reduce the number of annoying ads. Trust me, you are not making more money with those sidebar widgets and other things that can make your visitor tired of your website. You should also make your content easy to eye-scan by structuring it well. Cleaner web pages allow your visitors to focus more on your content and urge them to explore your website further and, thus, lower your bounce rate. There is a great blog post on Crazyegg about this.

4. HAVE A SIMPLE AND STRAIGHTFORWARD CALL-TO-ACTION

People may think that having ten calls-to-action on a web page will generate more conversions than a single one. This is, 99% of the time, not accurate. Having a simple, single, and direct call to action is the best way to generate a conversion. Don’t annoy your visitor; keep him engaged.

5. IMPROVE YOUR MOBILE VERSION

More and more users are navigating the Web using mobile devices. Today, we have more surfers using mobile devices than desktops, so your website should work better and faster on mobile than on desktop if you want to succeed. The goal here is to have a beautiful and functional mobile version of all of your web pages. If you are a blogger or a newspaper webmaster, you should also invest time and money in creating an AMP (accelerated mobile page) version of your pages. Again, if you are running WordPress, there’s an easy and free plugin to generate them for you.

6. HAVE A WELL SET UP GOOGLE ANALYTICS INSTALLATION

It is crucial to make sure that your Google Analytics installation is correctly configured. Let’s say that you have a landing page where you just want the user to send you his or her email address. If someone accesses this page and gives you his or her e-mail address, this is not a bounce visit right? You reached your goal. In this scenario, you need to send an event hit to Google Analytics every time someone clicks on that “send” button on your web page. This way, Google Analytics will not track this visit as a bounce. The same goes for pages that answer a quick and simple question a user may have. If someone enters your web page and scrolls to the bottom in a 5-minute span, you can be sure that this was not a bounce visit. What you need to do in this scenario is to install a script to track scroll depth that sends an engagement event hit to Google Analytics every time a threshold is passed. This is a good idea.

That’s it for today, folks. If you have questions or post suggestions for us, please feel free to use the comments section below.